Zeynep Tufekci ( /ˈzeɪnɛp tʊˈfɛktʃi/ ZAY-nep tuu-FEK-chee; Turkish : Zeynep Tüfekçi ) is a Turkish [13] writer, academic , and techno-sociologist well known for her research on the social implications of emerging technologies in the context of politics and corporate responsibility . She is an associate professor at the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina and a faculty associate at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University in Massachusetts.

In 2015, Tufekci was named an Andrew Carnegie Fellow in the Social Sciences and Humanities [2] for the inaugural class.

Early Life

Zeynep Tufekci was born in Istanbul , Turkey , near Taksim Gezi Park in Istanbul's Beyoğlu district. [14]

Education

Zeynep Tufekci graduated from University of Texas at Austin with a Ph.D after writing her dissertation , “In Search of Lost Jobs: The Rhetoric and Practice of Computer Skills Training" in 2004. She had previously received a Master of Arts from the university after writing her thesis, “Mental Deskilling in the Age of the Smart Machine" in 1999. [18] [12]

In 1995, Tufekci received a Bachelor of Arts from Istanbul University in Sociology . She had also graduated from Bosphorus University in Istanbul with a bachelor's degree in Computer Programming . [18] [12]

Career

Zeynep Tufekci began her career as a computer programmer before becoming an academic and turning her attention to social science . Her research and publications include topics such as the effect of big data on politics and the public sphere, [15] how social media affects social movements , and the privacy and security vulnerabilities exposed by the coming Internet of Things . In general, she has sought to outline the potential negative societal consequences of social media and big data, while not rejecting these phenomena outright.

Tufekci is currently an associate professor at the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina (UNC) and a faculty associate at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University in Massachusetts. [12] She was previously a fellow at Princeton University 's Center for Information Technology Policy for two years. Tufekci began her career in academia as a visiting assistant professor at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County before becoming a assistant professor at the university. [18]

Tufekci has been a regular contributor to The Atlantic [3] and is a monthly contributor for The New York Times [4] op-ed page on topics related to the social impact of technology.

In October 2014, Tufekci gave a TED talk on online social change, for example, which argued that while technology can make organizing social movements easier, it does not necessarily lead to better outcomes. [7] [26]

She was also featured in a special report by The Economist on Technology and politics in which she argues that the increasingly individualized targeting of voters by political campaigns is leading to a reduction of the " public sphere " in which civic debate takes place publicly. [8]

In March 2018, Tufekci wrote "YouTube may be one of the most powerful radicalizing instruments of the 21st century." She cited the rise of conspiracy theory videos during the Presidency of Donald Trump and especially after the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Shooting in Parkland, Florida . [19]

Books

In May 2017, Zeynep Tufekci's first book Twitter and Teargas: The Power and Fragility of Networked Protest was published by the Yale University Press . Tufekci discusses both the power and weaknesses of using new technologies such as social media to mobilize protesters and create social movements. [23] [11] The book was analyzed by Nathan Heller as part of an article for The New Yorker discussing books about protest. [20]

Tufekci is currently working on a second book to be titled Beautiful Teargas: The Ecstatic, Fragile Politics of Networked Protest in the 21st Century , to be published by Yale University Press, which will examine the dynamics, strengths and weaknesses of 21st century social movements. [12]