The 2014 Florida gubernatorial election took place on November 4, 2014, to elect the Governor and Lieutenant Governor of Florida , concurrently with elections to the United States Senate in other states, elections to the United States House of Representatives , and various state and local elections .

Incumbent Republican Governor Rick Scott ran for and won re-election to a second term in office. [2] The Democratic nominee was former Governor Charlie Crist . Crist was elected Governor as a Republican in 2006 but did not run for re-election in 2010, instead running for the U.S. Senate. In April 2010 and while still in office, he left the Republican Party to run as an Independent instead. He was defeated in the general election by Republican nominee Marco Rubio . In December 2012, Crist joined the Democratic Party. With the loss, Crist became the first person in Florida history to lose statewide elections as a Democrat, Republican, and Independent. Libertarian nominee Adrian Wyllie and several candidates with no party affiliation also ran.

The consensus among The Cook Political Report , [3] Governing , [4] The Rothenberg Political Report , [5] Sabato's Crystal Ball , [6] Daily Kos Elections , [7] and others [8] [9] [10] was that the contest was a tossup.

Republican primary

Candidates

Declared

Withdrew

Declined

Endorsements

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Rick
Scott
Someone
else
Other Undecided
March 15–18, 2013 326 ± 5.4% 42% 43% 14%
January 11–13, 2013 436 ± 4.7% 50% 40% 10%
December 11–17, 2012 1,261 ± 2.8% 30% 53% 16%
September 22–25, 2011 472 ± 4.5% 53% 37% 10%

Results

Republican primary results [33]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rick Scott 831,887 87.65%
Republican Elizabeth Cuevas-Neunder 100,496 10.59%
Republican Yinka Adeshina 16,761 1.77%
Total votes 949,144 100%

Democratic primary

Candidates

Declared

Withdrew

Declined

Endorsements

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Charlie
Crist
Buddy
Dyer
Dan
Gelber
Pam
Iorio
Anthony Shriver
Kennedy
Jimmy
Morales
Bill
Nelson
Nan
Rich
Alex
Sink
Rod
Smith
Other Unde-
cided
January 16–21, 2014 243 ± 6.3% 58% 16% 25%
November 24–26, 2013 380 ± ? 45% 32% 4% 19%
November 12–17, 2013 1,646 ± 2.4% 60% 12% 2% 26%
September 27–29, 2013 337 ± ? 59% 16% 25%
March 15–18, 2013 500 ± 5.4% 50% 9% 3% 21% 16%
Jan. 30 – February 4, 2013 600 ± 4% 43% 1% 14% 5% 37%
January 11–13, 2013 401 ± 4.9% 52% 4% 13% 1% 18% 12%
September 2012 600 ± 4% 29% 3% 8% 2% 1% 31% 26%
September 8, 2012 1,689 ± 2.4% 60.9% 7% 3.5% 25.1% 3.4%

Results

Democratic primary results [33]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Charlie Crist 623,001 74.36%
Democratic Nan Rich 214,795 25.64%
Total votes 837,796 100%

Libertarian Party

Candidates

Declared

Withdrew

  • John Wayne Smith, activist and perennial candidate [71]

Declined

Independents

Candidates

Declared

Withdrew

Disqualified

Write-in candidates

  • Piotr Blass
  • Running mate: Bob Wirengard [8]
  • Timothy Michael Devine
  • Running mate: Diane Smith [8]
  • Emelia Sandra Harris
  • Running mate: Georgianna G. Harris [8]
  • Monroe Lee
  • Running mate: Juanita Lockett [8]
  • Caleb Pringle
  • Running mate: Jeffery Lunsford
  • Charles Frederick Tolbert
  • Running mate: Christine Timmon [8]

General election

Candidates

The following candidates will appear on the ballot for the general election: [9]

  • Running mate: Greg Roe, insurance executive [9]
  • Glenn Burkett (Independent), businessman and perennial candidate [75]
  • Running mate: Jose Augusto Matos
  • Running mate: Lateresa A. Jones

Endorsements

Predictions

Source Ranking
Cook Political Report [3] Toss up
Governing [4] Toss up
The Rothenberg Political Report [5] Toss up
Sabato's Crystal Ball [6] Leans Democratic
Daily Kos Elections [7] Toss up

Campaigning

As of early June 2014, Scott had spent almost $13m since March on television adverts attacking Charlie Crist, who then appeared the likely Democratic nominee. Although the ads resulted in a tightening of the race, this came about by decreasing Crist's favorability ratings. By contrast, Scott's favorability ratings did not increase. [14] By late September, Scott's television ad spending had exceeded $35m [14] [14] and in mid-October it reached $56.5 million, compared to $26.5 million by Crist. On October 22 it was reported that Scott's total spending had exceeded $83 million and he announced that, having previously said he would not do so, he would be investing his own money into the campaign, speculated to be as much as $22 million. [14]

Crist hoped to draw strong support from Florida's more than 1.6 million registered black voters, an effort that was challenging with regards to his previous political career as a Republican. A poll conducted in September 2014 by Quinnipiac University revealed his support among black voters was at 72 percent against Scott, which was below the 90 percent analysts believed he needed to win. [14]

Scott and Crist met in a debate on October 15, held by the Florida Press Association at Broward College . [14] The debate required candidates to receive at least 15% support in major polls to be included. This was allegedly increased from 10% after Wyllie met the initial criteria, [14] but the Miami Herald reported that the threshold had been 15% since 2013. [14] The decision has been criticised as "suppressing choice" [15] and the Wyllie campaign has filed a lawsuit to be included in the debate. [15] U.S. District Judge James I. Cohn dismissed the lawsuit. [15] At this debate, Scott refused to take the stage for seven minutes because Crist had a small electric fan under his lectern. The incident was dubbed "fangate" by media sources such as Politico . [135]

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Rick
Scott (R)
Charlie
Crist (D)
Adrian
Wyllie (L)
Other Undecided
November 2, 2014 1,834 ± 2.3% 45.5% 45.5% 6.3% 2.7%
November 1–2, 2014 1,198 ± 2.8% 44% 44% 6% 6%
46% 47% 7%
October 30–November 2, 2014 2,559 ± 2% 42.8% 41.3% 10.1% 5.8%
October 28–November 2, 2014 817 ± 3.4% 41% 42% 7% 1% 9%
42% 44% 3% 11%
October 28–31, 2014 688 ± 3.8% 38% 45% 8% 9%
October 25–31, 2014 1,795 ± 2.7% 41% 41% 5% 13%
October 29–30, 2014 1,300 ± 2.7% 46% 44% 4% 6%
October 28–29, 2014 800 ± 3.5% 45% 43% 5% 7%
October 27–29, 2014 508 ± 4% 44% 39% 4% 13%
October 24–28, 2014 850 ± 3.1% 36% 36% 6% 20%
October 22–27, 2014 817 ± 3.4% 40% 43% 8% 9%
42% 45% 2% 11%
October 20–26, 2014 4,893 ± 1.4% 41.9% 39.4% 11.9% 6.8%
October 22–24, 2014 861 ± 3% 42% 44% 14%
October 16–23, 2014 5,422 ± 2% 46% 45% 2% 7%
October 14–20, 2014 984 ± 3.1% 42% 42% 7% 1% 8%
44% 44% 2% 11%
October 16–19, 2014 500 ± 4.9% 40% 43% 8% 9%
45% 45% 10%
October 13–19, 2014 4,701 ± 1.5% 41.1% 40.2% 12% 6.7%
October 17, 2014 1,855 ± 2.3% 43.9% 45.3% 8.4% 2.5%
October 15–17, 2014 1,114 ± 3% 47% 47% 2% 4%
October 10–13, 2014 566 ± 4.2% 41% 45% 7% 7%
October 9–13, 2014 610 LV ± 4% 44% 44% 9% 4%
850 RV ± 3.5% 40% 42% 10% 8%
October 11–12, 2014 1,023 ± 3% 44% 42% 14%
October 7–12, 2014 781 ± 3.2% 40% 40% 6% 7%
October 6–12, 2014 6,384 ± 1.3% 39.4% 40.5% 12.5% 7.6%
October 8–11, 2014 3,128 ± 1.8% 45% 44% 8% 3%
September 29–October 8, 2014 471 ± 4.74% 38% 43% 10% <1% 9%
42% 47% 2% 9%
October 2–6, 2014 594 ± 4.1% 42% 44% 6% 8%
September 29–October 5, 2014 6,494 ± 1.2% 39.1% 40.2% 13.1% 7.6%
October 3–4, 2014 1,161 ± 2.9% 43% 45% 8% 5%
September 20–October 1, 2014 5,689 ± 2% 47% 44% 1% 8%
September 26–29, 2014 588 ± 4.1% 40% 46% 8% 6%
September 22–28, 2014 3,356 ± 1.7% 40.1% 41.1% 11.1% 7.7%
September 19–22, 2014 588 ± 4.1% 43% 42% 4% 11%
September 17–22, 2014 991 ± 3.1% 44% 42% 8% 1% 5%
46% 44% 2% 7%
September 18–21, 2014 813 ± 3.5% 43% 39% 4% 5% 7%
September 15–21, 2014 6,079 ± 1.3% 40.7% 40.6% 11.1% 7.5%
September 12–15, 2014 571 ± 4.2% 44% 39% 7% 9%
September 8–14, 2014 3,660 ± 1.7% 40.8% 40.3% 8.1% 10.8%
September 8–10, 2014 1,000 ± 3% 40% 42% 18%
September 5–8, 2014 576 ± 4.2% 45% 44% 3% 8%
September 4–7, 2014 1,000 ± 3.1% 47% 41% 12%
September 4–7, 2014 1,000 ± 3.1% 43% 40% 5% 12%
46% 40% 14%
September 4–7, 2014 818 ± 3.8% 39% 42% 8% 11%
41% 44% 14%
September 1–7, 2014 4,386 ± 1.5% 41.7% 40.3% 7.7% 10.3%
September 2–4, 2014 625 ± 4% 43% 41% 4% 1% 11%
August 18–September 2, 2014 5,962 ± 2% 46% 43% 4% 8%
August 27–31, 2014 814 ± 3.4% 40.93% 35.74% 6.32% 17.01%
43.71% 37.57% 18.72%
August 27–28, 2014 580 ± 4.2% 43% 45% 4% 7%
August 14–24, 2014 859 ± 4% 37% 37% 26%
August 18–24, 2014 9,333 ± 1% 41.6% 38.6% 9% 10.7%
August 15–18, 2014 564 ± 4.2% 44% 41% 4% 8% 4%
August 11–17, 2014 12,812 ± 0.9% 43.5% 41.1% 15.4%
August 10–13, 2014 627 ± 4% 41% 35% 4% 20%
44% 41% 15%
July 31–August 4, 2014 576 ± 4.2% 45% 43% 8% 4%
July 28–August 3, 2014 4,714 ± 1.5% 45.1% 43.7% 11.3%
July 29–30, 2014 900 ± 3% 42% 41% 8% 9%
July 5–24, 2014 6,873 ± ? 48% 43% 4% 5%
July 17–21, 2014 1,251 ± 2.8% 37% 39% 9% 1% 15%
40% 45% 2% 12%
July 17–21, 2014 564 ± 4.2% 40% 46% 8% 6%
June 26–July 6, 2014 1,202 ± 3.5% 47% 40% 13%
June 30–July 4, 2014 558 ± 4.2% 45% 43% 7% 5%
June 20–23, 2014 1,232 ± 3% 41% 39% 6% 15%
June 20–23, 2014 541 ± 4.3% 42% 41% 8% 8%
June 11, 2014 806 ± 3.5% 41% 38% 4% 17%
June 5–10, 2014 556 ± 4.2% 40% 44% 8% 8%
June 6–9, 2014 672 ± 3.8% 42% 42% 16%
May 28–June 4, 2014 500 ± 5% 43% 41% 16%
May 20–22, 2014 531 ± 4.3% 42% 40% 9% 8%
May 9–12, 2014 554 ± 4.2% 41% 44% 7% 8%
May 4–6, 2014 800 ± 3.4% 42% 38% 20%
April 23–28, 2014 1,413 ± 2.6% 38% 48% 2% 12%
April 23–25, 2014 907 ± 3% 44% 43% 5% 9%
April 2014 ? ± 4.3% 41% 44% 6% 8%
April 21–22, 2014 750 ± 4% 39% 45% 6% 10%
April 15–17 & 21–22, 2014 700 ± 3.8% 42% 42% 4% 12%
April 14–15, 2014 868 ± 3.33% 45% 43% 5% 7%
April 10–14, 2014 502 ± 4.5% 41% 46% 7% 6%
April 1–3, 2014 814 ± 3.1% 42% 49% 10%
March 31–April 3, 2014 800 ± 3.46% 45% 44% 1% 10%
March 16–19, 2014 500 ± 5.0% 39% 43% 18%
March 6–16, 2014 507 ± 4.35% 33% 34% 17% 17%
January 27–February 1, 2014 1,006 ± 3% 40% 47% 13%
January 30–31, 2014 808 ± 4% 44% 47% 3% 6%
January 22–27, 2014 1,565 ± 2.5% 38% 46% 16%
January 14–20, 2014 700 ± 3.8% 44% 49% 7%
January 16–21, 2014 591 ± 4% 41% 43% 15%
December 1–8, 2013 400 ± 5% 34% 46% 20%
November 24–26, 2013 1,000 ± 3.1% 45% 49% 6%
November 12–17, 2013 1,646 ± 2.4% 40% 47% 2% 12%
November 8–10, 2013 932 ± 3% 36% 46% 19%
September 30–October 8, 2013 526 ± 4.27% 40% 44% 2% 14%
September 27–29, 2013 579 ± 4.1% 38% 50% 12%
August 1–2, 2013 3,034 ± 1.8% 29.5% 40.1% 8.7% 21.7%
June 11–16, 2013 1,176 ± 2.9% 37% 47% 2% 12%
March 15–18, 2013 500 ± 5.4% 40% 52% 8%
March 13–18, 2013 1,000 ± 3.1% 34% 50% 1% 15%
January 30–February 4, 2013 600 ± 4% 41% 41% 7%
January 11–13, 2013 501 ± 4.4% 39% 53% 8%
August 31–September 2, 2012 1,548 ± 2.5% 42% 45% 13%
July 26–29, 2012 871 ± 3.3% 41% 44% 15%
November 28–December 1, 2011 700 ± 3.7% 32% 55% 13%
September 22–25, 2011 476 ± 4.5% 38% 51% 11%
June 16–19, 2011 848 ± 3.4% 34% 56% 10%

Results

Florida General Election 2014 [15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Rick Scott/Carlos López-Cantera 2,865,343 48.1% -0.77%
Democratic Charlie Crist/Annette Taddeo-Goldstein 2,801,198 47.1% -0.62%
Libertarian Adrian Wyllie/Greg Roe 223,356 3.8% +3.8%
Independent Glenn Burkett/Jose Augusto Matos 41,341 0.7%
Independent Farid Khavari/Lateresa A. Jones 20,186 0.3% +0.16%
Plurality 64,145 1.07% -0.15%
Turnout 5,951,561
Republican hold