Beachbody LLC is an American multinational corporation that uses direct response infomercials, multi-level marketing,[5] e-commerce and individual sales consultants, also known as coaches, to sell fitness, weight loss, and muscle building home-exercise videos.

History

Beachbody was founded in 1998 in Santa Monica, California.

Products

P90X is a 90-day home fitness system developed by trainer Tony Horton. The program includes 12 workouts that use resistance and body-weight training, cardio, plyometrics, abdominal work, martial arts and yoga. It also comes with a nutrition plan, fitness guide, and workout calendar. This fitness plan focuses on what it refers to as "muscle confusion;" a cross-training method that switches the order of exercises and incorporates varied movements. It is claimed that muscle confusion prevents the body from adapting to exercises over time, resulting in continual improvement and minimizing plateaus.[5]

Insanity is a 60-day workout regimen with a focus on strenuous stamina training. Developed by Shaun T., the Insanity program emphasizes "max interval training", a method of exercising during which one works out strenuously for 3–4 minutes and then rests or "cools down" for approximately 30 seconds before starting the process again. No weights or any other equipment are needed for the workout. The Insanity workouts are strenuous and designed for people who are already in good shape. It is not intended for people with cardiovascular, pulmonary, and metabolic diseases, diabetics, or obese people, and people with orthopedic limitations.[6]

Focus T25 was released September 2013 and was developed by Shaun T. The program provides one 25-minute exercise per day. This fitness system has two cycles - Alpha and Beta. During the Alpha cycle, the workouts are said to build the foundation of total-body fitness. Users will perform cardio that is promoted as a method of burning calories and improving speed and agility, while developing strength and resistance training that doesn't require any weightlifting. When users are in the Beta phase, the 25-minute workouts focus on core cardio. Speed drills are billed as a method of burning calories. This workout features vertical and horizontal moves.[7][8]

Controversy

In a 2015 posting to Cosmopolitan.com, Michelle Ruiz reports that some call Team BeachBody a "scheme". She quotes Marion Nestle, PhD, a professor of nutrition and food studies at New York University, as saying "It never ceases to amaze me that anyone would fall for anything like this. ... It's about making money."[9]