Terran Petteway (born October 8, 1992) is an American professional basketball player for the Fort Wayne Mad Ants of the NBA Development League. He played college basketball for Texas Tech University and the University of Nebraska. Petteway led the Big Ten Conference in scoring during the 2013–14 season.

 

 

High school career

As a high school senior at Ball High School, Petteway was signed by Pat Knight, however Knight was fired on March 7, 2011 from his role as head coach of the Texas Tech Red Raiders basketball team before Petteway even suited up for the Red Raiders.[2] Petteway elected to maintain his commitment to Texas Tech after Billy Gillispie was hired as the Red Raiders new head coach on March 20, 2011.[3]

NameHome townHigh school / collegeHeightWeightCommit date
Terran Petteway
SF
Galveston, TXBall High School6 ft 5 in (1.96 m)200 lb (91 kg)Nov 15, 2010 
Scout:   Rivals:   247Sports:    ESPN:
Overall recruiting rankings:
  • Note: In many cases, Scout, Rivals, 247Sports, and ESPN may conflict in their listings of height and weight.
  • In these cases, the average was taken. ESPN grades are on a 100-point scale.

Sources:

  • . Rivals.com. Retrieved 2014-11-18. 
  • . Scout.com. Retrieved 2014-11-18. 
  • . ESPN.com. Retrieved 2014-11-18. 
  • . Scout.com. Retrieved 2014-11-18. 
  • . Rivals.com. Retrieved 2014-11-18. 

College career

Freshman year

As a true freshman at Texas Tech, Petteway saw action in 28 games and 10 of his 11 starts during the season came during Big 12 Conference play.[4] Texas Tech finished their 2011–12 season with just eight total wins and a single conference win, which was the deciding factor in Petteway electing to transfer to a different institution.[5]

Transfer to Nebraska

Petteway opted to sign with Tim Miles and the Nebraska Cornhuskers men's basketball program citing the previous relationship he had developed with Coach Miles during high school when Miles recruited him at Colorado State.[6]

Sophomore year

After sitting out during the 2012–13 season, Petteway was named co-captain for the Cornhuskers.[4] Petteway led the league in scoring, averaging 18.1 points per game, becoming the first Nebraska basketball player to lead the league in scoring since Andre Smith led the Big Eight Conference during the 1980–81 season.[4] He also helped guide the Nebraska Cornhuskers men's basketball team to its first NCAA Men's Division I Basketball tournament appearance since 1998.[7]

Junior year

Prior to the 2014–15 NCAA Division I men's basketball season, Petteway was named Preseason All-American first team selection by Bleacher Report.[8] He was a second team selection by CBSSports.com[9] and a third team selection by SB Nation,[7] and USA Today.[10] He was also listed as a John R. Wooden Award Preseason Top 50 candidate.[11]

In April 2015, Petteway declared for the NBA draft, forgoing his final year of college eligibility.[12]

College statistics

YearTeamGPGSMPGFG%3P%FT%RPGAPGSPGBPGPPG
2011–12Texas Tech281113.1.368.300.4622.0.7.2.23.1
2013–14Nebraska323231.7.426.327.8194.81.6.9.818.1
2014–15Nebraska313135.0.396.313.7114.92.81.1.918.2

Professional career

After going undrafted in the 2015 NBA draft, Petteway joined the Atlanta Hawks for the 2015 NBA Summer League.[13] On July 24, 2015, he signed with the Hawks.[14] However, he was later waived by the Hawks on October 22 after appearing in three preseason games.[15] On October 25, he signed with the Indiana Pacers, only to be waived by the team the following day.[16] On October 29, he was acquired by the Fort Wayne Mad Ants of the NBA Development League as an affiliate player of the Pacers.[17]

On July 5th, 2016, following his his season in the D-League, Petteway joined the Milwaukee Bucks for the 2016 NBA Summer League.[18]

Personal

Petteway has two older brothers, Terrell and Tavoir, both whom played college basketball. His oldest brother, Terrell played college basketball for Lamar University and also played professionally in England for the Sheffield Sharks.[19][20][4] His mother, Joetta, died on April 7, 2015 after a two and half year battle with follicular dendritic cell sarcoma at age 53, the same age her mother also died of cancer.[3][3]